I am reading Derrick Jensen’s book, Endgame, where in one chapter he describes some commonly-used weapons by the US military operations in Afghanistan. The horrifying power of one weapon in particular is absolutely unnecessary under any circumstances. A quote:

It is the BLU-82, also known as the Daisy Cutter. This fifteen-thousand-pound bomb, filled with an aqueous mix of ammonium nitrate, aluminum powder, and polystyrene soap, is so large that it can only be launched by rolling it out the rear door of a cargo aircraft, the MC-130 Hercules. The slowness of the cargo plane means Daisy Cutters can only be dropped when there are no defenses, in other words, only on those who are defenseless. A parachute opens, then the Daisy Cutter floats toward Earth. The parachute slows the descent enough to give the transport plane time to get away before the bomb explodes. The bomb detonates just above ground, producing what are called overpressure of one thousand pounds per square inch (overpressure is air pressure over and above normal air pressure: overpressures of just a few pounds are enough to kill people) disintegrating everything and everyone within hundreds of yards, and killing people (and nonhumans) at a range of up to three miles. General Peter Pace, vice-chair of the US joint chiefs of staff, put the purpose clearly: “As you would expect, they make a heck of a bang when they go off and the intent is to kill people.” Marine Corps General Trainer was even more specific about the effect of Daisy Cutters on the people of Afghanistan: “Besides the physical degradation, these — along with the regular ordinance dropped from B-52s — provide great psychological punishment, as victims begin to bleed from the eyes, nose, and ears, if they aren’t killed outright, of course. It’s a frightening, awesome assault they’re suffering, and there’s no doubt they are feeling our wrath.”

-page 56, Endgame

This bomb was also used in Vietnam and Iraq, initially to clear landscapes and the people who live there for makeshift helicopter landing zones, and has been used in Afghanistan to wantonly overturn rocks that al Qaeda might be hiding under. After using up the entirety of its remaining arsenal of BLU-82s (who knows where, and who knows how many) the US Air Force claims it exploded the last Daisy Cutter in Utah last year.